Blowing bubbles and making magic

Words were simply not coming out … clearly that is of course … for the longest time for my young daughter. She was making obscure noises, but nothing vaguely clear and I was a concerned parent.

There were other children in our church family born close to her who were rattling off words and putting sentences together, and there my daughter was forming her own unique language with her dolls.

Mu daughter learning how to use her mouth to blow bubbles. The image illustrates one learning opportunity from a recent snow day.

My daughter learning how to use her mouth to blow bubbles. The image illustrates one learning opportunity from a recent snow day.

The results of my persistence was getting tubes in her ears. I know she was younger than most, but I didn’t want her speech to get any farther behind than it already was at that point. Walking in and out of our early learning center, I see the progression of where my daughter needed to move towards and I only wanted the best for her.

The best part of her getting tubes was we were now going to see a speech pathologist.

He is kind.

Gentle.

Goofy.

And loves kids.

And more importantly, my daughter loves him.

One of our recent appointments, he awarded her with a small canister of bubbles which she absolutely loved. I asked him how the bubbles were going to help her and he gave me an eye opening comment. He mentioned there was nothing magical about the bubbles that was going to correct her speech deficiency, but it was meant for her to symbolically understand her mouth (the act of blowing bubbles) could form into something magical or special. In addition, we don’t always work on things that are 100 percent speech; there is more to children than the numbers and letters on his charts.

Sitting back and pondering

That evening I sat back and thought about the man’s comment to me about the bubbles, and it got me to thinking about my teaching. Many days I sit in meetings analyzing data and looking at different instructional strategies of improving the data. My laser focus on the curriculum is expected by all teachers.

However, I also remember the days of school prior to analyzing data and not always having the laser like focus.

Sometimes I realize those days resulted in a lot more instructional freedom and looking at the whole child. I cannot count the number of students who have needs beyond the curriculum that are not addressed in schools.

I am challenging myself to look beyond the data meetings and provide what my students need beyond the curriculum. I want to see my students blow bubbles in my classroom and see what magical things occur in their lives.

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About briancookeducator

Husband, Daddy, teacher, #Mountaineer, coach, and aspiring school leader | Thoughts are my own.
This entry was posted in Instruction, Parenting and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Blowing bubbles and making magic

  1. susansverdi says:

    What a brilliant man: “He mentioned there was nothing magical about the bubbles that was going to correct her speech deficiency, but it was meant for her to symbolically understand her mouth (the act of blowing bubbles) could form into something magical or special.” I am sure your daughter was touched by this!

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